16 Jan’18

Insights from WIPO’s “World IP Indicators 2017” Report: Key Patenting Trends Around the Globe

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The World IP Organization (WIPO) has recently published its annual report titled: “World Intellectual Property Indicators 2017”, covering world IP filing activity for 2016.  The report is a comprehensive coverage of global patent and trademark filing trends, comparing and ranking the world’s leading regional patent and trademark offices (“IP Offices”) by their level of activity in the various categories.

At a high level, it seems like many of the trends observed in 2015 continue into 2016: the global number of filings and grants keeps trending up; China continues to dominate in terms of annual filings and grants (breaking another record of 1.3 million filings this year); and the top 10 filing companies worldwide are all Asia-based multinationals.

Patent Filing Trends

A record number of 3 million patent applications were filed worldwide in 2016, up 8.3% from 2015, as seen in the figure below:

Source: World IP Indicators 2017, WIPO

Driving the strong growth in global filings was an exceptional number of filings in China. The State Intellectual Property Office of the People’s Republic of China (SIPO) received 1.3 million patent applications in 2016 – more than the combined total for the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO; 605,571), the Japan Patent Office (JPO; 318,381), the Korean Intellectual Property Office (KIPO; 208,830) and the European Patent Office (EPO; 159,358). Together, these top five offices accounted for 84% of the world total in 2016.

Below is a summary table showing the activity in the top 10 IP Offices in 2016:

Source: World IP Indicators 2017, WIPO

When it comes to understanding China’s continued explosive growth in new patent applications – over 1.3 million filed in 2016, an increase from the 1.1 million in 2015 (the first year the 1 million filings barrier has been exceeded in any country) — the circumstances surrounding the increase in Chinese patent filings are unique and should have come as no surprise to anyone following the Chinese government’s five-year plan of 2011. As explained in an article published in Nov. 2016 in the EE Times by Foresight’s president, Efrat Kasznik, over the last 50 years the Chinese Communist Party implemented a series of five-year plans which guided China’s rapid economic growth.  The 2011 five-year plan’s themes of sustainable growth included some specific targets for patent filing per capita.  The increased filing activity over the last five years is the direct result of a calculated government effort, enabled by an unprecedented allocation of legislative and administrative resources to support China’s State IP Office. Thus, the sharp rise in Chinese patent filings between 2010 and 2016 is very unique to China’s political circumstances, and is not necessarily correlated with the natural progression of innovation.

When reviewing filing trends by country, one of the most critical observations is the ratio of resident to non-resident filings.  A higher ratio of non-resident filings in any given country, is usually an indication not only of the size of that market for the underlying innovations, but also of the strength of the IP enforcement regime in that country.  Here, the trends from 2015 are repeating in 2016: as explained by Ms. Kasznik in her article, ratio in China is about 90% resident filers to 10% non-resident filers, a reflection of the relatively weak enforcement regime in China.  Conversely, the USPTO and the European Patent Office exhibit a ratio of resident to non-resident filings of about 50/50, attesting to the strength of IP enforcement regimes in those regions.

Patent Grants Trends

In 2016, an estimated 1.35 million patents were granted worldwide, up 8.9% on 2015.

Source: World IP Indicators 2017, WIPO

SIPO granted 404,208 patents in 2016, followed by the USPTO (303,049), the JPO (203,087), KIPO (108,875) and the EPO (95,956). The top five IP offices issued more than 1.1 million combined, accounting for 83% of the world total.

Not surprisingly, the number of new grants is trending upwards over time along with the number of new filings.  The WIPO report also includes statistics related to the operational efficiency of IP offices, such as: the number of examiners, application pendency times, and patent examination outcomes.  The workload of IP offices as measured by the number of incoming patent applications has increased over time, but so has their examination capacity to process those applications. The WIPO data show there has been no significant increase in application-to examiner ratios, and for a number of IP offices, growth in numbers of examiners has outstripped the increase in applications.

Another interesting metric reported is the number of patents in force in 2016: the estimated number of patents in force worldwide rose from 7.8 million in 2009 to 11.8 million in 2016. The USPTO leads with 2.8 million patents in force in 2016, followed by the JPO (2 million), SIPO (1.8 million) and KIPO (1 million). These four IP offices account for 63% of all patents in force worldwide.

Filing by Company

The top 10 patent applicants worldwide are Asia-based multinationals: Canon Inc. (Japan) was the top applicant for the period from 2011 to 2014, with 30,476 patent families worldwide, followed by Samsung Electronics (Korea) with 26,609 patent families, and Japanese companies Panasonic (22,899), Toshiba (22,627) and Toyota (22,190). Robert Bosch of Germany (16,582) was the highest-ranking non-Asian company at number 12.

Only 9 countries of origin comprise the top 100 list of applicant companies for the period from 2011 to 2014: Japan (40), China (26), Korea (15), U.S. (9), Germany (6) and one each from France, the Netherlands, Sweden and Taiwan.

 

 

Full article here
19 Dec’17

Year in IP: 3 Outstanding IP Deals of 2017

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The past year has seen some exciting developments in the IP marketplace, as well as in the technology markets where the underlying innovation is created. As a way to recap the 2017 “Year in IP,” we wanted to highlight three deals that uniquely reflect this year’s trends and the factors impacting the market (listed below in no particular order). These IP deals were not necessarily selected for their size, but for their indicative nature of a set of circumstances that exist in the current markets that made these deals possible, and even necessary, for the parties involved.

  1. Transfer of Allergan’s Patents to the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe

    In September 2017, pharmaceutical giant Allergan executed a deal with the Saint Regis Mohawk Indian Tribe to transfer ownership of all Allergan patents related to the eye drug Restasis to the Tribe. The St. Regis Tribe received $13.75 million upfront for the deal, and is eligible to receive up to $15 million in annual royalties. The deal takes advantage of the Tribe’s sovereign immunity status which essentially shields the patents from challenges with the USPTO’s Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) known as Inter Partes Reviews (or IPRs).  This deal comes at a critical time, just as Restasis starts to face generic competitors.  For more coverage of this deal, please read here.

    We selected this deal because it represents the forces of change in the IP marketplace, and how IP holders find ways to circumvent changes in patent law in ways that the legislator never imagined possible.  Love it or hate it, this deal is interesting and thought provoking, and has been one of the most polarizing events in terms of reactions from various stakeholders in the IP marketplace.  Several lawmakers frowned upon the move, and have since introduced bills to make similar IP transfers illegal.  It should be noted that public universities also enjoy sovereign immunity status.  Earlier this year, the PTAB dismissed IPR challenges against the University of Florida based upon its claim of sovereign immunity.

  2. AT&T’s Patent Sale to Uber

    This ground-breaking deal represents a major acquisition of 87 issued patents and 5 patent applications by Uber from AT&T in 2017 (for an undisclosed amount). The AT&T patent acquisition gives Uber a portfolio of patents having priority dates pre-dating Uber’s formation in 2009, as well as most of the ridesharing industry in general. The IP covers various technologies related to messaging, call handling, routing network traffic, VoIP, and billing. Five of the AT&T patents are specifically related to ridesharing.  This deal has recently been named the LES USA-Canada’s High-Tech Sector’s Deal of Distinction for 2017, and received an award at the LES Annual Meeting in Chicago.  For more coverage of this deal, please read here.

    We selected this deal because it represents a trend of multi-billion dollar startups (also known as “Unicorns”) buying patents to “backfill” their portfolios and enhance their IP position (the term “Backfill” is reserved for buying patents with priority dates pre-dating the inception of the company).  We predicted this trend in late 2015, when we published a study on the IP holdings of Unicorns, titled: “The Naked Truth: Why 30% of Unicorns Have No patents”.  One of the most important findings in our study was the documentation of an “IP Gap”: the IP holding distribution within the group of Unicorns was not correlated with the value distribution. We further observed that this “IP Gap” varies greatly by industry, with some industries, like Consumer Internet (the industry where Uber has been classified) completely out of balance.  We predicted that: “this gap could serve as an opportunity for increasing the liquidity of some IP assets in the marketplace, as some of these companies will no doubt show up as buyers as their exit event approaches, as they try to enter new markets, as they encounter incumbent patent lawsuits, or any such event that forces them to strengthen their IP position.

  3. OnStream’s Patent Sale in Japan

    In February 2017, our client, OnStream Media Corporation (OTCMKTS: ONSM), entered into a Patent Purchase Agreement with a group of buyers in Japan, for the sale of 2 U.S. Patents and related U.S. Patent Applications, including all rights, title and interest in those patent assets. In accordance with the Agreement, the total purchase price is a minimum of $40 million and a maximum of $80 million. The patents address live streaming of audio and/or video from multiple devices to a storage location, such as the Internet or cloud, and the ability to access and retrieve the audio and/or video from multiple devices, whereby the content is not stored on the device.  The patents had been acquired by OnStream through the acquisition of Auction Video in 2007, and the company kept prosecuting and maintaining the assets over the years.

    We selected this deal because it was entered into by one of our IP strategy clients, following a monetization plan that we devised for them.  It shows that if you understand the IP marketplace and where buyers are, patents can still be sold and monetized with sizable returns.  The deal represents a trend that we are seeing in the patent marketplace over the last few of years of foreign buyers interested in US patents as a way to obtain freedom to operate in the US, or just to get a foot in the door in the lucrative US enforcement market.  Japan is one of the latest countries to come onboard the patent monetization scene, following in the footsteps of other Asian countries, like China and Korea.  This is a very complex deal that is still unfolding, and we hope our client is successful in realizing the full potential of these assets.

Have you come across an exceptional IP deal in 2017? Let us know! We are happy to include your IP deal in our future newsletters.

Full article here
21 May’15
5 steps to follow for hiring top performers

5 steps to follow for hiring top performers

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Recent news stories noted that it was 10 times easier to get a job at Goldman Sachs than at Google. While these are two different industries with different needs for talent, the story highlights the intensifying fight for top talent between Wall Street and Silicon Valley — in part due to the changing nature of banking jobs, which no longer meet the profiles of thrill-seeking applicants.

This revelation raises the question of how banks, or any other organization, can consistently attract top talent and how to make sure there’s a good fit between the applicant and the position.

I sat down with Gary Morais, whose company developed a suite of HR software tools called 10Rule, which helps companies hire and train their employees to match the top 10 percent of performers for every position.

Full article here
01 May’15
The fastest-growing start-up

Race to $2 billion: The fastest-growing start-up

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Scores of start-ups worth more than $1 billion, known as “unicorns” in the industry, have gained substantial venture-capital funding in the last two years. Dozens have surpassed a $2 billion valuation. And several have passed the $2 billion in just two years.
Slack, the enterprise communication platform that’s taken on traditional email platforms, has become the fastest start-up company to reach a $2 billion valuation, according to data from financial information firm Pitchbook.

Full article here